Thursday, April 7, 2011

Amenimomakezu by Miyazawa Kenji

kobus magnolia


Miyazawa Kenji was a fine educator who lived after his ideal life in the northeast and wrote poems. Amenimomakezu is the title of the poem below. The literal translation of it is “Not to be defeated by also rain.” Ame (rain) nimo (also) makezu (not defeated). This poem is one of the most popular modern Japanese poems.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenji_Miyazawa




“never let rain bother” by Miyazawa Kenji


translated by keiko amano




never let rain bother

never let winds bother

never let snow or the heat of summer bother her

built with a strong body

with no greed

never hold grudges

always smiles in a quiet way

eats two bowls of brown rice a day with a bit of miso paste and some vegetables

acts on various matters without considering herself

looks, listens, and understands well

plus not forgetting

under the shade of a pine tree out in a field

she lives in a tiny thatched-roof hut

in the east, if a child fell ill, she goes out there to care for the child

in the west, if a mother grew exhausted, she goes and carries the mother’s load instead

in the south, if a man dropped near death, she goes and tells him, “Don’t be afraid”

in the north, if someone started a fight or tried to file a lawsuit, she says,

“That’s stink. Stop it”

on a drought summer, she let her tear well up

on a cold summer, she plods about

everyone calls her Blockhead

no compliment

no complaint

that’s the kind of person

I want to be

2 comments:

ashok said...

Keiko

A beautiful poem with a beautiful picture.

Keiko this is something I have been meaning to ask many a times. Have you thought of changing the background colors of your blog to softer colors ever? or even changing the design for a make over. Blogger has many new options in the design section.

keiko amano said...

Ashok,

Thank you.

Is the color too strong? Well,
I hate to touch the design. The last time I did, I suffered and regretted it. I want to go back the way it was, but I didn't back it up. Maybe in July, I might think about changing it.