Saturday, January 15, 2011

Tree and a Plate

The oak tree near the old San Dimas Station 




These are mixture of things.  Some people call them junks.  There is no particular theme,  no design in mind.  The center plate is there because I couldn't find the place to store.  Once, I placed it on the window, it made its permanent home.  That's all.  I forgot why, but I promised Dorraine I would upload this plate.  It's the 50th anniversay plate my grandfather received from his university which he used to call it Kuramae.  The picture must be the original campus. 


no design in mind. 


16 comments:

keiko amano said...

I couldn't delete extra phrase "no design in mind" for some reason. Maybe, that accident gave a meaning to this blog.

Dorraine said...

What a unique, slanty, oak tree! And love the beautiful arrangement in the window. Your grandfather would be delighted that his plate took center stage. It's a gorgeous plate, Keiko, and a wonderful reminder of your loved one. Thanks for sharing. :-)

keiko amano said...

Dorraine,

Thank you. Yes, the tree is greatly slanty. It isn't easy to find such tree.

A friend of mine said she used to think that the plate showed an European scene. I didn't think of it, but at the turn of two centuries ago, Japan started to imitate western architecture. The smoke and red brick building were the most modern and a beginning sign of industrialization in Japan. The graduation year was 1913.

ashok said...

Beautiful arrangement in the window and the plate looks like it belongs there. Perhaps a stone statue of Buddha can be the only competitor to that plate to my mind. Great view of trees too.

keiko amano said...

Ashok,

If my mother looked at the window, she would be very unhappy. I'm embarrassed, but I'm the one showing it you. I'm forever a conflicting person, I guess.

The top row, I simply lined up a variety of guinomi (sake cups) in a single file. The bottom row, I placed randomly all kinds of potteries in different shapes. Therefore, they are made for different functons and made in different kilns. My pottery teacher's large vase is on far left, and my own creations are two vases on right, and they are black and white glazed.

For Buddha statues, I admire them in museums, but I've never thought of having one in my house. Do you have one in your house?

ashok said...

Yes Keiko we have had one in our home ever since I was a child - brass ones - that are relatively easily available here. I cam e to regard these as fortunate. I do not know which of my brothers took our childhood Buddha statue, but I have procured another one and He sits proudly on a book shelf in the living room.

Some persons keep a laughing Buddha statue here at home ( he is the fat fraud version of Buddha) and find him fortunate but my experience is that it is only fortunate for persons who are mean and lie a lot for others the standard Buddha statue in a meditating sitting pose appears to be the best.

We do not worship the statue although we give it much respect. He just sits silently in the living room unobtrusively.

ZACL said...

Goodness! The oak tree seems to be half buried in sand. Most unusual.

I think the plate found its own resting place, it does seem to belong in the position it is photographed in. The nick-knacks almost seem to a campus supporting the inner life of the plate. The total setting seems to me to be very symbolic.

keiko amano said...

Ashok,

Please take a photo of your Buddha statue on your bookshelve and talk about it. It's interesting to me how you feel about Buddha. Buddha is for Buddhism. You are a Hindu, is that right? Hindu believes in many gods, so do you consider Buddha one of them? Am I confused? I'm sorry for my ignorance about Hindu and Buddhism in India. I thought Buddhism disappeared more than 1000 years ago from India, and only very few Indian people practice Buddhism today.

Even in 600 or 700 AD, when a famous Chinese monk went to India, he found the Buddhism was already in decline.

keiko amano said...

ZACL,

Your take on the plate and the campus is poetic. I feel it has given respectibility to my chaos and laziness. On behalf of my mother in heaven, thank you very much.

Yes, the tree is huge, and buried is the right word. It's like grandfather.

ashok said...

Keiko, I was born into an officially Hindu family and that is my official religion.

My beliefs are ecumenical though.

Yes there is only a small percentage of Buddhists in India now but some ancient and grand monasteries remain.

Taking a photo of the Buddha is a good idea. If I succeed I shall put it in my blog and talk about it.

ashok said...

I agree with Zacl's description Keiko. I think even your lazy attempt is very artistic. Aesthetics that flows easily and effortlessly is the mark of an aesthetic soul.

ashok said...

A especially aesthetic point is the placing of the pottery tea pot( ? ) to the side rather than center.

ZACL said...

I think it would be really hard, Keiko, to replicate what you have shown us, with premeditated organisation. It just would not flow. As it is, there is a simple beauty within the setting.

keiko amano said...

Ashok,

The far left brown pottery is a receptical for a strainer. The third from the left in the front row is a whitish unglazed pottery with a long green handle. It is a container to add some live coal to a pilot light. On right side of the plate and the back row, you see a dark broken looking plate. It is a vase made out of a roof tile from an old temple. All the pieces I have here are not a part of set, and each has unique purpose and shape. I think one of them is made just for adding a bit of soup base or hot water to a dish already served. In chanoyu, utensils are main attractions.

keiko amano said...

ZACL,

Thank you. Your comment tickles my bone. My mother must be giggling up there. I appreciate it very much.

keiko amano said...

Ashok,

Thank you for many positive comments. Actually, this is a good chance for me to show a back view to Japanese culture, so to speak. I think not only for non-Japanese but also most Japanese do not know what those utensils are for. I can sit here and discuss about each piece on and on. Probably that's what I will do when I can no longer travel.

I hope you share some Indian utensils and talk about them. You must have things unique to India that we can't even imagine what they are. I'll wait for such blogs.